nasin panke

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Caution: The subject of this article is nonstandard and will not be understood by most speakers.
It is recommended to familiarize yourself with the standard style, and to be informed and selective about which nonstandard styles you adopt.
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nasin panke is a style of speech developed in the toki pona francophone Discord server.

nimi panke[edit | edit source]

antikontitutonelema[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈan.ti.kon.ti.tu.to.ne.le.ma/
Usage 2023: Not notable (0%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

antikontitutonelema is a word meaning "a big mess", containing the disallowed syllable *ti. It is derived from anticonstitutionnellement, meaning "unconstitutionally".

apelo[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈa.pe.lo/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

apelo (apelo) is a word relating to drinking with friends to relax, often but not always including alcoholic beverages. It is derived from the word apéro, meaning "apéritif".

The sitelen pona glyph appears to depict a shot glass combined with the glyph for pona (pona), with a citrus slice garnish.

kalapisituji[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈka.la.pi.si.tu.ji//j/ sounds like English Y, as in "fjord" or "hallelujah".
Usage 2023: Not notable (0%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

kalapisituji (kalapisituwi) is a word relating to nonsense. The word lacks a fixed spelling beyond the start kalapis-, and speakers purposely use different spellings while considering it the same word. It is derived from Belgian slang carabistouille, meaning "nonsense".

kikolo[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈki.ko.lo/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

kikolo is a word meaning "funny". It is derived from the word rigolo. The sitelen pona glyph (kikolo) is based on a Shadok, from the animated show Les Shadoks.

kikulo[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈki.ku.lo/
Usage 2023: Not notable (0%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

kikulo (kikulo) is a word relating to immaturity. It is derived from kikoolol.

kokoliko[edit | edit source]

A rooster and a hen
A rooster and a hen
Pronunciation /ˈko.ko.li.ko/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

kokoliko (kokoliko) relates to the genus Gallus, that is, chickens, roosters, and junglefowl. It comes from French cocorico, the sound of a rooster, equivalent to English cock-a-doodle-doo. The rooster is the national animal of France,[1] and crying cocorico is an informal way of expressing national pride or of rejoicing over a French victory, usually with a note of irony.[2][3]

kosikosa[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈko.si.ko.sa/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

kosikosa (kosikosa) is a word relating to averageness. It is derived from comme ci comme ça, meaning "neither good nor bad". The word kusikusa is an alternative spelling to this.

masalo[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈma.sa.lo/
Usage 2023: Not notable (0%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Semiparticle

masalo (masalo) is an interjection expressing one's anger or disapproval. It is derived from colloquial expression mince alor.

olala[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈo.la.la/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

olala (olala) is an interjection equivalent to phrase oh là là.

panke[edit | edit source]

Baguettes
Baguettes
Pronunciation /ˈpan.ke/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

panke (panke) relates to French culture or the French language, such as making a calque out of it. It may also refer to a baguette, commonly associated with French people and culture. The word was derived from the Toki Pona word pan and French baguette.

nasin panke, meaning "French style of speech", is itself named after this word.

pipolo[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈpi.po.lo/
Usage 2023: Not notable (0%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

pipolo (pipolo) is a word described as "something that is supposed to be kikolo but isn't". It is a corruption of the word kikolo, inspired by the Toki Pona word pipo and French c'est du pipo.

sapelipope[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈsa.pe.li.po.pe/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Semiparticle

sapelipope (sapelipope) is an interjection expressing dismay, translated as "fiddlesticks". It is derived from the dated word saperlipopette.

sikako[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈsi.ka.ko/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

sikako (sikako) relates to snails, gastropods or animals deemed similar. The word is derived from the French escargot, meaning "snail".

wiwi[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation /ˈwi.wi/
Usage 2023: Not notable (1%)Caution: Most speakers don't understand this word.
Book and era No book
Part of speech Content word

wiwi (wiwi) is an interjection expressing approval and content word relating to agreement and consent. It is derived from the phrase oui oui.

External links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]